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HAMNET SARL EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION 


HAMNET AMATEUR RADIO EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK 

IN HAMNET's Amateur Radio Report........a week of much activity - read more...........

Scroll down for more

 

 

 

 

WHEN ALL FAILS AMATEUR RADIO SUCCEEDS 

Something has gone terribly wrong. Normal ways of doing things are not working. The fastest way to turn an emergency into a full disaster is to lose communications.

Radio Amateurs understand emergencies. For over 70 years they have provided emergency communications for organisations. When normal ways of communication fail or get overloaded Radio Amateurs will be there.  

HAMNET, the National Emergency Communications division of the South African Radio League (SARL), provides communications for emergencies and can mobilise experienced communicators who with their own radio equipment will back up official channels or take over when all else fails.

 

The SARL represents all Radio Amateurs in South Africa at all levels of Government and through the IARU at the International Telecommunications Union. Radio Amateurs or "Hams" use two-way radio communication to make contact with other radio amateurs all over the world. They are even able to use satellites and on occasion speak with astronauts. Radio Hams can do this from home or while mobile in cars, boats or on foot.

Radio Hams have a full range of communication modes at their disposal. These include plain voice, Morse code, numerous digital computer modes and even graphical modes like television. A licensed radio amateur is able to join in experiments using all these modes.

 

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HAMNET CALL-SIGNS, MEETINGS AND BULLETIN SCHEDULES

Headquarters Report 

SUNDAYS - during the AMATEUR RADIO TODAY transmission, starting at 10h00 South African Standard Time (SAST), on HF and on many VHF and UHF repeaters around the country. (Current bulletin posted below)

Western Cape ZS1DZ or ZS1DCC

On the 1st Wednesday evening of the month, HAMNET's Western Cape monthly meeting is held at 19h30 SAST at Tygerberg Hospital's Provincial Emergency Management Centre.  

The radio bulletin is transmitted at 19h30 SAST on a Wednesday evening, on the local 145.700MHz repeater, with relays on to 1845 or 3760, and 7110kHz LSB, 144.300MHz USB, and Echolink, via ZS1DCC-R, on the 2nd and consecutive Wednesdays of each month.

Eastern Cape ZS2PE or ZS2BRC

There is a weekly net on 52.950MHz at 20h00 SAST on a Wednesday evening, and local HAMNET news is included in the PEARS bulletin on Sunday morning at 08h45 SAST on the 145.700Mhz repeater, with a relay on to 7098kHz LSB.

Northern Cape ZS3NC

Free State ZS4DCC

KwaZulu Natal ZS5DCC or ZS84SIG

Quarterly meetings are held on the 2nd Saturday afternoon of the month, at 12h30 for 13h00 SAST, either at Ethekwini Disaster Managment Centre or the 84th Signals Unit in Durban. The next 2 dates are 10/9 and 10/12. 

On Sunday mornings at 07h00 SAST, on 145.625MHz, there is a bulletin, also relayed on to 3760 and 7110kHz. 

There is a formal radio bulletin at 19h30 SAST once a month on a Wednesday evening,on the 145.625MHz Highway repeater, and informal nets at the same time, and on the same frequency, every other Wednesday evening.

Gauteng South ZS6

Monthly meetings are held on the first Thursday of the month at 19h00 SAST at the East Rand Branch clubhouse. On all other Thursday evenings, a social gathering is held at the same venue to chat or maintain equipment. 

Gauteng North ZS6PTA

Limpopo ZS6

Mpumalanga ZS6

Northern Western Province ZS6 

  

 

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HAMNET REPORT 21 JANUARY 2018   

Tropical Cyclone Berguitta-18 has been moving South-West all week, missing Madagascar, but pummelling Reunion and Mauritius, and other small French Islands to the East of Madagascar. The FaceBook page entitled "Mauritius Cyclone Updates" has some vivid video of ravines and rivers coming down in torrential flood, threatening to wash bridges and properties away. There has not been much news in the press of damage or loss of life, and Saturday's reports say that Berguitta had weakened into a moderate tropical storm by Friday evening. Presumably the flooding will take a week or so to subside. HAMNET is not aware of any emergency traffic being passed from that area.

Meanwhile a tropical depression has been present in the Mozambique channel for the last few days, but does not seem to be moving Southwards, so stormy conditions in Mozambique or over the North-East of South Africa have not been experienced. We'll keep our eye on that one.

Arrangements are being made with the Western Cape HAMNET Division, for the two sporting events soon to happen in the Cape. The 99er Cycle Tour takes place on Saturday 10th February, where at least 16 of our volunteers will do their stuff along the way. Plans are at an advanced stage for that one. And I have been contacted by the organisers of the Two Ocean's Marathon, on Easter Saturday, to start the wheels turning amongst the HAMNET operators who are already starting to volunteer for that. If you are a Western Cape HAMNET Member, and would like to assist us, please contact the writer at ZS1DFR@TELKOMSA.NET. Thank you.

From the ARRL letter of this week is the news that uncharacteristically cold weather in central Florida in early January prompted members of the North Brevard Amateur Radio Club (K4NBR) to assist the area's homeless population. The New Year began with a bitter cold front descending upon central Florida, bringing below-freezing temperatures, especially concerning for those lacking regular shelter from the elements. NBARC members Ricky Deluco, K4JTT; Robert Ortiz, KJ4VEH; William Klosowski, K4SVT, and Michael Ellixson, KE4MWZ, set out in their own vehicles, searching the city of Titusville for homeless residents. For the next two evenings, and using Amateur Radio as communications, the group worked in the cold, wet weather for more than 12 hours, logging some 190 Km on the roads around Titusville.

The Disabled American Veteran Centre in Titusville had opened its doors as a cold weather shelter and offered a warm place to sleep and eat. The ham radio group alerted local law enforcement, so they were aware of the effort, and in the hope that on-duty officers might also reach out. The group was able to locate five homeless individuals on its first evening tour of the town and provide them with transportation out of the cold. Local police also contacted the team to help and to provide transportation for other homeless individuals located by on-duty officers.

One additional homeless person located late on the first night had a need for immediate medical attention and was transported to a local hospital. -- Thanks to Ricky Deluco, K4JTT

From the same source, we are told that a November 2017 Department of Defence (DoD)-sponsored communications interoperability exercise involving Amateur Radio was a success, according to information received from US Army Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS) Program Manager Paul English, WD8DBY. The November 4-6 drill, which focused on interoperability between DoD elements including MARS, other federal agencies, and the Amateur Radio community, simulated a coronal mass ejection (CME) event. Army and Air Force MARS organizations worked in conjunction with the Amateur Radio community, primarily on the 60-meter interoperability channels as well as on HF NVIS frequencies and local VHF and UHF, non-internet linked Amateur Radio repeaters.

The Amateur Radio portion of the exercise kicked off with a high-power information broadcast on 60-meter channel 1 (5,330.5 kHz) from a military station on the east coast and the Fort Huachuca HF gateway station in Arizona. The high-power broadcast provided basic exercise information and requested that amateur stations make contact with MARS stations on 60 meters and provide county-by-county status reports for the 3,143 US counties and county equivalents, in order to gain situational awareness and to determine the extent of impact of the scenario. Radio amateurs also were given the opportunity to submit a reception report and receive a QSL card.

"Leaders from the supported DoD headquarters as well as the chiefs of both the Army and Air Force MARS programs appreciated the nearly 2,000 Amateur Radio stations that trained during this exercise," English said. -- Thanks to US Army MARS Program Manager Paul English, WD8DBY, and The ARRL ARES E-Letter.

Exciting news comes from Mars, the planet, where the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) investigated eight steep and eroded slopes (known as "scarps") at various locations across Mars. At each of these locations, they found thick shelves of relatively pure water ice located as little as 1 meter below the planet’s surface. Furthermore, some of these massive ice deposits were found to be more than 100 meters thick. 

According to the research paper, “The ice exposed by the scarps likely originated as snow that transformed into massive ice sheets, now preserved beneath less than 1 to 2 [metres] of dry and ice-cemented dust or regolith near ±55° latitude.” In 2008, the Phoenix Mars Lander discovered similar ice deposits along Martian scarps, but they were found in regions much closer to the planet’s northern pole.

The discovery of these large reservoirs of pure water ice adds yet another piece of evidence supporting the increasingly held theory that water ice not only exists on Mars, but also is surprisingly common. Although the ice could obviously be used as a source of water for future manned missions to Mars, scientists have a long way to go before then. However, with the Mars 2020 rover just a few years away, the discovery of eight more tantalizing sites ripe for investigation is still an exciting find.

 

This is Dave Reece ZS1DFR reporting for HAMNET in South Africa.


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This page last modified: 6/7/2016