Not Logged in

Hamnet




HAMNET News
Hamnet Projects and Events
Hamnet Emergency Frequencies
Emergency communication by amateur radio stations.
Hamnet Rules & Organization
Policy statement on membership of Hamnet
Hamnet Application Form
Minutes of last Hamnet meeting [PDF]
The HAMNET Manual
PDF format, right click and "save target as"
Hamnet Message Form
Minutes of last Teleconference


HAMNET SARL EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION 


HAMNET AMATEUR RADIO EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK 

IN HAMNET's Amateur Radio Report........a week of much activity - read more...........

Scroll down for more

 

 

 

 

WHEN ALL FAILS AMATEUR RADIO SUCCEEDS 

Something has gone terribly wrong. Normal ways of doing things are not working. The fastest way to turn an emergency into a full disaster is to lose communications.

Radio Amateurs understand emergencies. For over 70 years they have provided emergency communications for organisations. When normal ways of communication fail or get overloaded Radio Amateurs will be there.  

HAMNET, the National Emergency Communications division of the South African Radio League (SARL), provides communications for emergencies and can mobilise experienced communicators who with their own radio equipment will back up official channels or take over when all else fails.

 

The SARL represents all Radio Amateurs in South Africa at all levels of Government and through the IARU at the International Telecommunications Union. Radio Amateurs or "Hams" use two-way radio communication to make contact with other radio amateurs all over the world. They are even able to use satellites and on occasion speak with astronauts. Radio Hams can do this from home or while mobile in cars, boats or on foot.

Radio Hams have a full range of communication modes at their disposal. These include plain voice, Morse code, numerous digital computer modes and even graphical modes like television. A licensed radio amateur is able to join in experiments using all these modes.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

HAMNET CALL-SIGNS, MEETINGS AND BULLETIN SCHEDULES

Headquarters Report 

SUNDAYS - during the AMATEUR RADIO TODAY transmission, starting at 10h00 South African Standard Time (SAST), on HF and on many VHF and UHF repeaters around the country. (Current bulletin posted below)

Western Cape ZS1DZ or ZS1DCC

On the 1st Wednesday evening of the month, HAMNET's Western Cape monthly meeting is held at 19h30 SAST at Tygerberg Hospital's Provincial Emergency Management Centre.  

The radio bulletin is transmitted at 19h30 SAST on a Wednesday evening, on the local 145.700MHz repeater, with relays on to 1845 or 3760, and 7110kHz LSB, 144.300MHz USB, and Echolink, via ZS1DCC-R, on the 2nd and consecutive Wednesdays of each month.

Eastern Cape ZS2PE or ZS2BRC

There is a weekly net on 52.950MHz at 20h00 SAST on a Wednesday evening, and local HAMNET news is included in the PEARS bulletin on Sunday morning at 08h45 SAST on the 145.700Mhz repeater, with a relay on to 7098kHz LSB.

Northern Cape ZS3NC

Free State ZS4DCC

KwaZulu Natal ZS5DCC or ZS84SIG

Quarterly meetings are held on the 2nd Saturday afternoon of the month, at 12h30 for 13h00 SAST, either at Ethekwini Disaster Managment Centre or the 84th Signals Unit in Durban. The next 2 dates are 10/9 and 10/12. 

On Sunday mornings at 07h00 SAST, on 145.625MHz, there is a bulletin, also relayed on to 3760 and 7110kHz. 

There is a formal radio bulletin at 19h30 SAST once a month on a Wednesday evening,on the 145.625MHz Highway repeater, and informal nets at the same time, and on the same frequency, every other Wednesday evening.

Gauteng South ZS6

Monthly meetings are held on the first Thursday of the month at 19h00 SAST at the East Rand Branch clubhouse. On all other Thursday evenings, a social gathering is held at the same venue to chat or maintain equipment. 

Gauteng North ZS6PTA

Limpopo ZS6

Mpumalanga ZS6

Northern Western Province ZS6 

  

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

 

HAMNET REPORT 18 FEBRUARY 2018   

 

Hamnet is in a pickle! Why, I hear you ask?

Well, in an article published in Science Alert, the question is asked: "If we receive a message from Aliens, should we delete it without reading?"

Scientists have been conducting multiple surveys in the hopes of find indications of "technosignatures" – i.e. evidence of technologically-advanced life (such as radio communications), for at least 50 years.

To put it plainly, if humanity were to receive a message from an extraterrestrial civilisation right now, it would be the single greatest event in the history of civilisation.

But according to a new study, such a message could also pose a serious risk to humanity. Drawing on multiple possibilities that have been explored in detail, they consider how humanity could shield itself from malicious spam and viruses.

The paper, titled "Interstellar communication. IX. Message decontamination is impossible", recently appeared online.

The study was conducted by Michael Hippke, an independent scientist from the Sonneberg Observatory in Germany; and John G. Learned, a professor with the High Energy Physics Group at the University of Hawaii.

Together, they examine some of the foregone conclusions about SETI and what is more likely to be the case.

To be fair, the notion that an extraterrestrial civilisation could pose a threat to humanity is not just a well-worn science fiction trope. For decades, scientists have treated it as a distinct possibility and considered whether or not the risks outweigh the possible benefits.

As a result, some theorists have suggested that humans should not engage in SETI at all, or that we should take measures to hide our planet.

As Learned told Universe Today via email, there has never been a consensus among SETI researchers about whether or not ETI would be benevolent:

"There is no compelling reason at all to assume benevolence (for example that ETI are wise and kind due to their ancient civilisation's experience).

"I find much more compelling the analogy to what we know from our history… Is there any society anywhere which has had a good experience after meeting up with a technologically advanced invader? Of course it would go either way, but I think often of the movie Alien… a credible notion it seems to me."

In addition, assuming that an alien message could pose a threat to humanity makes practical sense.

Given the sheer size of the Universe and the limitations imposed by special relativity (i.e. no known means of faster-than-light travel), it would always be cheaper and easier to send a malicious message to eradicate a civilisation compared to an invasion fleet.

As a result, Hippke and Learned advise that SETI signals be vetted and/or "decontaminated" beforehand.

In terms of how a SETI signal could constitute a threat, the researchers outline a number of possibilities.

Beyond the likelihood that a message could convey misinformation designed to cause a panic or self-destructive behaviour, there is also the possibility that it could contain viruses or other embedded technical issues (i.e. the format could cause our computers to crash).

They also note that, when it comes to SETI, a major complication arises from the fact that no message is likely to be received in only one place, making containment possible.

In the end, it appears that the only real solution is to maintain a vigilant attitude and ensure that any messages we send are as benign as possible.

As Hippke summarised: "I think it's overwhelmingly likely that a message will be positive, but you cannot be sure. Would you take a 1 percent chance of death for a 99 percent chance of a cure for all diseases? One learning from our paper is how to design [our] own message, in case we decide to send any: Keep it simple, don't send computer code."

Basically, when it comes to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, the rules of internet safety may apply. If we begin to receive messages, we shouldn't trust those that come with big attachments and send any suspicious looking ones to our spam folder.

So if Darth Vader decides, with evil intent, to send you a possibly encrypted 3D hologram from Death Star, either by audio, or digitally on your PC, do think twice before opening the attachment, will you?!

On the other hand, if some of you had given up all hope of receiving a HAMNET message from Bouvet Island because the 3Y0Z team is sadly in Cape Town licking its wounds instead of working a pile-up on the island, there may be hope ahead.

The ARRL Newsletter of 15 February notes that Peripatetic Polish DXpeditioner Dom Grzyb, 3Z9DX, and four other operators announced over the weekend that their postponed plans to mount the 3Y0I DXpedition to Bouvet Island are back on.

"Our trip, planned originally at the end of 2017, was cancelled at the request of the organizers of the 3Y0Z expedition," an announcement said. "Due to the cancellation by the [3Y0Z] organizers, we are now returning to the implementation of our project and preparations for our trip as a matter of urgency."

DX-World has reported that the 3Y0I license has been renewed and a landing permit -- good for 1 year -- issued by the Norwegian Polar Institute. While no specific dates for the DXpedition have been announced, the 3Y0I team said its plans call for operating during the sub-Antarctic summer, which suggests they could be on the air late this year.

The 3Y0I team said it has chartered a seagoing yacht adapted for extreme weather conditions to make the 12-day, 2,800-nautical mile trip from South Africa to Bouvet Island. The team anticipates operating for about 2 weeks. In addition to 3Z9DX, the 3Y0I operators will include Stanislaw, SQ8X; Leszek, SP3DOI; Branko, YU4DX, and Frans, J69DX.

However, the sun is having the last laugh at the moment. The magnetic canopy of sunspot AR2699 exploded on 12 February, for more than 6 hours. The blast produced a C1-class solar flare, and hurled a Coronal Mass Ejection directly at Earth.

For the last three days, Earth has been experiencing a Geomagnetic storm, with high A indices of about 12, and K indices of 4 or higher. With a Solar Flux Index currently of 72, you're not going to hear Darth Vader or Bouvet very clearly for a while yet!

This is Dave Reece ZS1DFR reporting for HAMNET in South Africa. 


 


Copyright © 1997-2018    South African Radio League
This page last modified: 6/7/2016